Marriage Story: Review

As I get older as a movie fan, I have come to hope that once a year, a new movie will come out that I will like above all the others released. All I want is to be able to say “this was “the best” or “my favorite” of the year” and not be in doubt about my favorite. Last year without question I felt A Star Is Born was not only my favorite, but I strongly felt it was the best movie of the year.

While the year is not over, and there are many more films for the year to see, I feel very confident that I’ve seen what my favorite movie of the year is. At the time of this writing is the best movie of the year with Noah Baumbach’s Marriage Story starring Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver.

I remember thinking after my first viewing of A Star Is Born last year that it had been several years since a movie made me feel so much all at once, and yet just a year later I see a film that has undoubtedly equaled that, if not eclipsed last years’ experience.
Marriage Story takes you down the road that Nicole and Charlie’s haven chosen when they decide to divorce. They both share demanding careers as well as one son named Henry. They start out trying to be as accommodating and supportive of each other as possible by going through mediation.

The mediation process soon crumbles, and Nicole heads to L.A. with Henry to begin working on a T.V. series while Charlie continues to direct theater in NYC. Location ultimately becomes the most significant and most contentious point of the divorce. Nicole quickly finds herself in the hands of a high priced L.A. divorce attorney while Charlie is struggling to keep up with his ever-growing career that is soon moving to Broadway. Charlie continues to try and stay close to his son and be as accommodating as possible while not giving up.

The emotion and realism that is woven into the film through Baumbach’s script and the actor’s portrayals are nothing short of a perfect storm. The look and feel are truly timeless, and you could be watching Kramer Vs. Kramer or a John Cassavetes film because the story and characters are so paramount that you can’t help but fixate your attention on them.

Marriage Story takes you through the heartbreak and frustration of the ending of a marriage and how it truly is like a grieving process. Just as you feel you’ve chosen sides and defined the enemy, something shows the other side of the tale from the other party.

When it is all said and done, you are left heartbroken and just grateful that everyone made it through unscathed, and you get the genuine feeling that everyone will be ok and taken care of, which is all we can ask for in life anyway. I haven’t gotten as good at predicting awards, at least winners, as I used to be. Still, I would be genuinely dumbfounded not to see this film get nominated all over its possible destinations because its just too good not to recognize. Marriage Story is a movie that, at the end of the credits, I always will say to myself, “It’s because of movies like this, that I love movies!”